August 31, 2010

Camp Lohikan Fly-Over

Flew over Camp Lohikan to see Rosa. There she is, by the pool, just left of the tennis courts.

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She spent Sat., Sun., Mon. and Tue. there with NYC kids and parents. It was hosted by the CSC, Christian Service Community.

Sometimes It's Not About Me

Sometimes this blog is not about me, N498TH. Sometimes I visit my friends and post their picture. Here is a picture of N5017N. She is a B-17G-VE, which is a Flying Fortress called "Aluminum Overcast".

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She was at the Waterbury/Oxford Airport over the weekend. I spent the day with her there but flew back to Danbury at night.

August 21, 2010

Westfield Air Show 2010

The weather was perfect for the air show today. Rich and I left Danbury at about 6AM and got to Westfield when the tower openned at 7AM. Flight Service was saying to stay clear of this area after 8AM but the TFR didn't start until 10AM.

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Tens of thousands came to see my plane and the Thunderbirds, who were also there today.

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I parked in front of the tower at Aero Design and had a great view of the air show. Thanks Tom!

June 26, 2010

Greenwood Lake (4N1) Airport

Checking oil level before take-off at Greenwood Lake (4N1) Airport. That is one of four 18 cylinder Wright R-3350 engines on a "Connie" behind me. (The Constellation, the "World's Finist Trimotor", but that's another story.)

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Registration N9412H (delivered as Air France's first Constellation June 1946 as L049 F-BAZA) is parked adjacent to a flight school and cafe at Greenwood Lake Airport in West Milford, New Jersey. It was sold to Frank Lembo Enterprises in May 1976 for $45,000 for use as a restaurant and lounge, and flown into the airport in July 1977. It was sold to the State of New Jersey along with the airport in 2000, and the interior was refurbished and used as a flight school office in 2005.

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Note: The Constellation was the last aircraft Orville Wright flew on in 1944. He commented that the Constellation's wingspan was longer than the distance of his first flight.

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June 25, 2010

Flying the New York City SFRA (Hudson Exclusion)

I completed the FAA online course, "New York City Special Flight Rules Area (SFRA)" on December 18, 2009.
Today, I flew it. Rich took the pictures. I reported, "Grumman Cheetah, Alpine Tower, Southbound, 1000 feet.", and intrusion into the exclusion began. The next mandatory reporting point, on 123.05, was GWB.

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Glad I didn't have to pay the toll crossing the George Washington Bridge.

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The next reporting point was the Inrpid.

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The next reporting point was the Clock. Here is a good view of Ellis Island.

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Now the money shot, Liberty Enlightening the World. (Statue of Liberty mandatory reporting point.)

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The last reporting point is VZ. (Verrazano Narrows Bridge)

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We then flew around Hoffman and Swinburne Islands and headed back up the Hudson River estuary.


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May 11, 2010

Palling With My Buds

Today, Rich and I flew to Westfield, MA (BAF) so that AA5A could pal with his buddies.


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I didn't know a Grumman Cheetah is bigger than a Boeing Eagle.


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Even bigger than a North American Texan.



I think N498TH wants to go to the Airshow this year!

February 25, 2010

My Ice Runway Adventure

Monday, 22 February, was a blue sky Winter day. Rich met me at the Danbury Airport at 1000 and we discussed options of where to fly. We recently went to a class about flying the New York City Hudson Exclusion. That was an option. I also read about the Alton Bay Seaplane Base (B18) in the January issue of the AOPA PILOT magazine. That was the option "we" chose. (Rich is the "we" when we fly his plane.) I also told Rich, my navigator, that we should use the New York Sectional Aeronautical Chart to find the place and not the GPS. He looked at me as though I was crazy, but consented. I took off, climbed to 3500 ft., set the RPM to 2200, leaned the engine, turned on the autopilot and took directions from my navigator. Two hours later, burning 6.3 gph, we arrived at Alton Bay. My plan was to do a low approach and land at Laconia for fuel but the light winds were from the North, three planes were on the ice, and my approach was on the numbers so I landed Runway 01. Breaking was good but I used the whole runway, breaking gently. Another plane landed right after us.
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Rich, Navigator
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We had lunch at the Old Bay Diner and bought snacks for the trip home at Amy Lynn's.

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